Site Index | Site Tour

    or   Search Tips

National Center on Secondary Education and Transition: Creating opportunities for youth with disabilities to achieve successful futures.

Publications
Topics
E-News
Events
State Contacts
Web Sites
About NCSET
Home

E-mail this page

Juvenile Justice

Additional Resources


Web Products

Addressing the Unmet Educational Needs of Children and Youth in the Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare Systems (2012)
Georgetown University’s Center for Juvenile Justice Reform (CJJR) has released the second edition of “Addressing the Unmet Educational Needs of Children and Youth in the Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare Systems.” This paper outlines strategies for meeting the complex educational needs of children and youth involved with the juvenile justice and foster care systems. Updated material includes references and guides developed by the National Evaluation and Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk (NDTAC). Available in pdf (2.31 MB, 68 pp).
http://cjjr.georgetown.edu/pdfs/ed/edpaper2012.pdf

Differential Treatment of African American Youth (2000)
This article, produced by the National Center on Education, Disability and Juvenile Justice, examines key issues within the juvenile justice and mental health system that may contribute to the overrepresentation of African American men and boys within the justice system. The authors report upon efforts to address these imbalances.
http://www.edjj.org/Publications/pub_06_13_00_2.html

Juvenile Justice Resource Series from the Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health (2010-2013)
The Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health (TA Partnership) has a collection of publications to help communities meet the mental and behavioral health needs of youth in the juvenile justice system. These include: “A Primer for Mental Health Practitioners Working With Youth Involved in the Juvenile Justice System,” an overview for mental health practitioners working with youth involved in the juvenile justice system, emphasizing emerging research and practices; “New Directions for Behavioral Health Funding and Implications for Youth Involved in the Juvenile Justice System,” exploring how different funding sources meet the behavioral health needs of youth involved in the juvenile justice system; and “Screening and Assessment in Juvenile Justice Systems: Identifying Mental Health Needs and Risk of Reoffending,” on why juvenile justice agencies and their partners must use screening and assessment tools for mental health needs and risk of reoffending when planning the most effective course of action for youth.
http://www.tapartnership.org/content/juvenileJustice/resourceSeries.php

Reentry Programs for Students with Disabilities in the Juvenile Justice System: Four State Approaches (2011)
This policy analysis document from NASDSE’s Project Forum defines re-entry and describes federal efforts to support successful re-entry of juvenile justice offenders, the prevalence of students with disabilities in the juvenile justice system, and recommended re-entry strategies from experts in the field. The findings from interviews with four states and a review of program-related documents are provided. The goal of these four state programs is to reduce recidivism by supporting the transition of youth with disabilities from correctional facilities to community-based schools, jobs, and support services. Available in pdf (190 KB, 12 pp).
http://nasdse.org/DesktopModules/DNNspot-Store/ProductFiles/66_0082f096-5a9d-49f7-a2c1-c6ff737af209.pdf

Reforming Juvenile Justice: A Developmental Approach (2013)
National Academies Press has published “Reforming Juvenile Justice: A Developmental Approach,” the report that resulted from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention’s (OJJDP’s) request that the National Research Council convene a committee to study juvenile justice reform. The goal of “Reforming Juvenile Justice” was to review recent advances in behavioral and neuroscience research and draw out the implications of this knowledge for juvenile justice reform, to assess the new generation of reform activities occurring in the U.S., and to assess the performance of OJJDP in carrying out its statutory mission as well as its potential role in supporting scientifically-based reform efforts.
http://tinyurl.com/mvcyl72

Students with Disabilities & the Juvenile Justice System: What Parents Need to Know (2013)
“Students with Disabilities & the Juvenile Justice System: What Parents Need to Know” is a report from PACER Center on students with disabilities in the juvenile justice system. Youth with emotional, behavioral, learning, and cognitive disabilities are at a higher risk for involvement with the juvenile justice system, and are arrested and incarcerated at a higher rate than their non-disabled peers. Designed for parents of youth with disabilities who have already had contact with the juvenile justice system, this guide provides strategies and steps parents can use to protect their child’s rights in school and in court. It is available in pdf (1.0 MB, 16 pp).
http://www.pacer.org/jj/pdf/JJ-8.pdf


Print Products

Howard, D. K., & Peniston, L. C. (2002). The role of recreation in preventing youth with behavioral and cognitive disabilities from coming into contact with the juvenile justice system and preventing recidivism. Monograph series on education, disability, and juvenile justice. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research.
This monograph focuses on the role of recreation in preventing juvenile delinquency and recidivism among youth with disabilities.

Howell, K. W., & Wolford, B. I. (2002). Corrections and juvenile justice: Current education practice for youth with learning and other disabilities. Monograph series on education, disability, and juvenile justice. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research.
This monograph focuses on the educational services provided to youth with behavioral and cognitive disabilities who have been placed in the juvenile justice system.

Larson, S., & Hoover, J. H. (2000). Risk in our midst: Empowering teenagers to love the unlovable. Denver, CO: Group Publishing.
A look at bullying and how to address it through youth ministries and from a Christian perspective. Dr. Scott Larson, co-author of this book, is a minister who was based in Littleton, Colorado when the tragedy at Columbine occurred.

Leone, P., Quinn, M. M., & Osher, D. M. (2002). Collaboration in the juvenile justice system and youth serving agencies: Improving prevention, providing more efficient services, and reducing recidivism for youth with disabilities. Monograph series on education, disability, and juvenile justice. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research.
This monograph focuses on the need for collaboration between the juvenile justice system and youth-serving agencies.

Osher, D., Quinn, M. M., Kendziora, K., Woodruff, D., & Rouse, G. (2002). Addressing invisible barriers: Improving outcomes for youth with disabilities in the juvenile justice system. Monograph series on education, disability, and juvenile justice. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research.
This first in a series on youth with cognitive or behavioral disabilities and the juvenile justice system discusses the importance of prevention and early intervention to divert youth with disabilities from entering the justice system. It considers the various disabilities that put youth at greater risk for involvement with the juvenile justice system, especially learning disabilities and emotional, behavioral, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorders, and explores the path a youth takes on his or her way through the juvenile justice system.

Smith, C. R., Esposito, J., & Soleil, G. (2002). Advocating for children with disabilities in the juvenile justice system. Monograph series on education, disability, and juvenile justice. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research.
This article discusses the crucial role of advocacy for youth with disabilities in the juvenile justice system, stressing the importance of understanding the connection between disabilities and problematic behavior. It describes multiple barriers that often hamper youth with cognitive and other disabilities from receiving appropriate interventions that might help them avoid contact with the justice system or teach them new patterns of behavior after they have been incarcerated.


Web Sites

Center on Juvenile & Criminal Justice
The Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice (CJCJ) is a private non-profit organization whose mission is to reduce society's reliance on the use of incarceration as a solution to social problems. This is done through the provision of programs to persons facing imprisonment, education efforts about imprisonment and its effect on people, and technical assistance to entities wishing to establish and/or evaluate programs working with those facing imprisonment.
http://www.cjcj.org/

Forum for Youth Investment
This organization’s goal is to create strategic alliances among the full range of organizations that invest in youth, and to forge strong connections with organizations that invest in young children, families and communities. This Web site contains many resources including contact information for consultants, publications, working papers, articles, news and updates, an FYI newsletter, as well as specific attention to juvenile justice. The Forum is an initiative of the International Youth Foundation.
http://www.forumforyouthinvestment.org/

The Juvenile Justice Resource Hub from the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange
The Juvenile Justice Resource Hub is a comprehensive source of information on cutting-edge juvenile justice issues and reform trends.
http://jjie.org/hub/

National Juvenile Justice Evaluation Center
http://www.jrsa.org/projects/njjec.htm

National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice
The National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice provides various types of assistance to program administrators, policy makers, families, government officials, researchers, and service providers on a wide variety of issues. Center staff provide access to resources and specialized information, or help with a defined problem. This site includes online assistance, training, resources, projects, and more.
http://www.ncmhjj.com/

National Center on Education, Disability, and Juvenile Justice
The National Center on Education, Disability and Juvenile Justice (EDJJ) conducts technical assistance, training, and research while preparing publications in three key areas: delinquency prevention, educational services in detention and correction facilities, and transition/aftercare services. The Web site includes current research, training resources, conference listings and parent resources.
http://www.edjj.org

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) provides national leadership, coordination and resources to prevent and respond to juvenile delinquency and victimization. OJJDP’s Web site includes resources, publications and a calendar of events.
http://www.ojjdp.gov/

OJJDP National Training and Technical Assistance Center
The National Training and Technical Assistance Center (NTTAC) supports the delivery of high quality training and technical assistance to the juvenile justice field. This site contains a wealth of information including a Roadmap for finding training and technical assistance as well as a Toolbox for providing effective training and technical assistance that includes curricula.
http://www.ojjdp.gov/programs/tta.html

OJJDP Statistical Briefing Book
Developed for OJJDP by the National Center for Juvenile Justice, the SBB provides answers to questions OJJDP most frequently receives from media, policymakers, and the general public.
http://ojjdp.gov/ojstatbb/

PACER Center Juvenile Justice Program
This site provides a wealth of resources on the relationship between juvenile justice and youth with disabilities. Included within this site are publications and links to other important resources.
http://www.pacer.org/jj

Web Page Collecting Links to Youth Courts
Global Youth Justice, in conjunction with the American Bar Association, is helping local youth courts in 41 states launch 250 websites to promote their juvenile justice diversion programs. More than 1,400 communities and tribes worldwide currently operate a youth justice program associated with their local peer, student, youth, or teen courts. These courts train teenagers to be judges, prosecutors, attorneys, and jurors who handle low-level offenses of their peers, promote accountability, provide access to youth resources, and model peer leadership.
http://www.globalyouthjustice.org/Youth_Websites.html

Other pages on this topic:


Other topics:


^ Top of Page ^


Publications  |  Topics  |  E-News  |  Events  | State Contacts

Web Sites  |  About NCSET  |  Home  |  Search


National Center on Secondary Education and Transition
Institute on Community Integration
University of Minnesota
6 Pattee Hall
150 Pillsbury Drive SE
Minneapolis MN 55455

© 2001-2017 Regents of the University of Minnesota
The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer.
Online Privacy Policy

This page was last updated on November 29, 2017.