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Juvenile Justice

Related Research

 

Larson, K. A., & Turner, K. D. (2002). Best practices for serving court-involved youth with learning, attention and behavioral disabilities. Monograph series on education, disability, and juvenile justice. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research.

This monograph identifies eight types of research-based effective practices for working with court-involved youth with disabilities. Interventions for court-involved youth with disabilities are skill-based, use positive discipline, and teach self-control, social-cognitive skills, and problem-solving. Those which involve the youth’s family are shown to reduce recidivism and to increase a youth’s prosocial behavior, commitment to school, and trust in working with systems.


Mears, D. P., Aron, L., & Bernstein, J. (2003). Addressing the needs of youth with disabilities in the juvenile justice system: The current status of evidence-based research. Washington, DC: National Council on Disability.

This report reviews the existing research as well as perspectives of service providers, administrators, policymakers, and advocates on youth with disabilities in the juvenile justice system. Chapters address background information, data and methodology, current laws, philosophical framework, disability, risk, and protective factors associated with juvenile delinquency, program and policy trends, promising practices, criteria/measures of effectiveness, implementation of disability law and programs, and recommendations.


Rutherford, R. B., Jr., Bullis, M., Anderson, C. W., & Griller-Clark, H. M. (2002). Youth with disabilities in the corrections system: Prevalence rates and identification issues. Monograph series on education, disability, and juvenile justice. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research.

This monograph reviews current data on individuals with disabilities who are involved in the juvenile justice system. Statistics on the prevalence of juvenile crime are followed by statistics on the prevalence of various disabilities in the corrections system, including specific learning disabilities, emotional disturbances, mental retardation, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorders.

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