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2005 National Leadership Summit on Improving Results for Youth

Concurrent Session Presentations

The following materials were presented at the concurrent sessions. Most PowerPoint presentations and other materials from the sessions are available for download as PDF files. Moderators' and presenters' names are linked to their biographies.

Sessions took place Tuesday, June 14 and included:

1:45-3:00 p.m.

  1. Adolescent Literacy
  2. Aligning Career Preparation with State Standards
  3. Collaborative Approaches to Improving Outcomes for Youth with Mental Health Needs
  4. Collecting and Utilizing Postschool Outcome Data to Improve Results for Youth with Disabilities
  5. The Elephants in the Room: What's Being Done to Solve Transportation, Healthcare, and Social Security Issues?
  6. Engaging Students to Go the Distance: What Research and Promising Practices Tell Us About Keeping Youth in School
  7. Strategies and Tools to Promote Interagency Collaboration
  8. Youth Development and Youth Leadership: Youth Voices

3:15-4:30 p.m.

  1. Focusing on Our Neediest Populations: Foster, Delinquent, and Special Education Youth
  2. Improving Results for Youth with Disabilities: What Can We Learn from NLTS-2?
  3. Improving Student Outcomes Through Innovative High School Designs
  4. Meeting the Transition Needs of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Youth with Disabilities and Their Families
  5. Self-Determination: The Intersection of Youth Development and Transition
  6. Standards and Assessments: Implications of No Child Left Behind

1:45-3:00 p.m.

Adolescent Literacy

Moderator: Bonnie Jones, U.S. Department of Education

Description: The International Reading Association (1999) states that youth entering the adult world today will read and write more than at any other time in our history. Instruction beyond the early grades is crucial as youth will need advanced levels of literacy to perform their jobs, run households, act as citizens, and conduct their personal lives. This session highlighted the latest research and practical application to improve literacy rates among all youth. Discussion focused on a deep history of research including studies by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the U.S. Department of Education. Strategies for improved adolescent literacy from the KnowledgeWorks Foundation were also shared.

Session Notes

Presenters:

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Aligning Career Preparation with State Standards

Moderator: Jennifer Sheehy Keller, Rehabilitation Services Administration, U.S. Department of Education

Description: Implementing transition services within a standards-based education framework presents a huge conceptual and practical challenge for educators, many who see the principles and goals as mutually exclusive. This session expanded the dialogue on aligning transition-focused curricula with general education curricula and meeting state graduation requirements. Also shared was a national career preparatory program for helping Latino youth achieve career standards.

Presenters:

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Collaborative Approaches to Improving Outcomes for Youth with Mental Health Needs

Moderator: Marlene Simon-Burroughs, Office of Special Education Programs, U.S. Department of Education

Description: In the past twenty years, an extensive knowledge base has been developed on children with emotional disturbance. These intensive research efforts suggest that results for youth with emotional disturbance can be improved through interventions that are sustained, flexible, positive, collaborative, culturally appropriate, and regularly evaluated. Presenters of this session focused on what is needed to encourage, assist, and support our nation’s schools in their efforts to improve the educational process to achieve better outcomes for youth with mental health needs.

Presenters:

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Collecting and Utilizing Postschool Outcome Data to Improve Results for Youth with Disabilities

Moderator: Marsha Brauen, Westat

Description: States and local school districts are recognizing the need to gather pertinent data on postschool outcomes in order to design and implement more effective transition programs and services. This session introduced how the new Postschool Outcomes Center can assist states with data collection, design, and methodology. Participants gained current knowledge related to data collection, data sources, and effective strategies to improve post-school outcomes through practical state examples.

Presenters:

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The Elephants in the Room: What’s Being Done to Solve Transportation, Healthcare, and Social Security Issues?

Moderator: Deborah Leuchovius, PACER Center

Description: Access to transportation, healthcare, and financial supports is integral in helping youth become healthy, self-sufficient adults. This session outlined the importance of these critical transition services and discussed how to align programs, services, resources, and supports necessary to helping youth achieve their postschool goals.

Presenters:

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Engaging Students to Go the Distance: What Research and Promising Practices Tell Us About Keeping Youth in School

Moderator: Loujeania Bost, National Dropout Prevention Center for Students with Disabilities

Description: Preventing dropout and improving the rate of school completion is a critical and immediate national goal. This session presented a national perspective and research on comprehensive dropout prevention programs and practices as well as information on a practical model which can be implemented locally.

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Strategies and Tools to Promote Interagency Collaboration

Moderator: Genee Norbert, District of Columbia Public Schools

Description: States continue to seek innovative approaches for improved interagency collaboration. In this session, researchers and practitioners shared such strategies and tools as resource mapping, communities of practice, National Standards and Quality Indicators for Secondary Education and Transition, and team development.

Presenters:

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Youth Development and Leadership: Youth Voices

Moderator: Bob Haugh, New Jersey Department of Education

Description: Youth development is a process that prepares a young person to meet the challenges of adolescence and adulthood and achieve his or her full potential. Providing the conditions for positive youth development is a responsibility that should be shared by communities, schools, and parents. Participants in this session heard about the difference youth development and leadership initiatives have made in these young people’s lives.

Presenters:

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3:15-4:30 p.m.

Focusing on Our Neediest Populations: Foster, Delinquent, and Special Education Youth

Moderator: Diane McCauley, Office of Vocational and Adult Education, U.S. Department of Education

Description: The problems faced by disadvantaged youth can be complex, confusing, and costly. These youth often fall through the cracks, resulting poor postschool outcomes. The federal government and others across the country are working to strengthen their role in research and evaluation of youth programs. This session examined what works to improve outcomes for disadvantaged youth.

Presenters:

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Improving Results for Youth with Disabilities: What Can We Learn from NLTS-2?

Moderator: Susan Hasazi, University of Vermont

Description: State governments and local school districts have long been challenged to improve student achievement, graduation rates, and transition to postsecondary education, employment, and other aspects of community living. In this session, data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 was shared. This study documents the experiences of a national sample of students ages 13-16 as they move from secondary school into adult roles. Data shared focused on high school coursework, extracurricular activities, academic performance, postsecondary education and training, employment, independent living, and community participation, and other topics.

Session Notes

Presenter:

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Improving Student Outcomes Through Innovative High School Designs

Moderator: Richard Luecking, TransCen, Inc.

Description: We have a new emphasis on strong commitment and support at the national, state, and local levels to ensure that all youth fully access and benefit from their high school experiences and graduate from our school systems prepared to successfully participate in postsecondary education, enter meaningful employment, and live independently in their communities—and an emerging national consensus on the core principles necessary to achieve these ends. This session highlighted two promising initiatives:

  1. First Things First, a framework for high school reform. This initiative has one goal: to help students at all academic levels gain the skills to succeed in post-secondary education and good jobs. In the process, FTF helps districts and schools meet the requirements of No Child Left Behind.
  2. Career Academies, a model for high school reform that supports student achievement, academic engagement, and community involvement.

The presenters discussed these initiatives and the implications of involving students with disabilities.

Presenters:

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Meeting the Transition Needs of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Youth with Disabilities and Their Families

Moderator: Marisa Brown, Georgetown University

Description: Persons with disabilities usually must overcome a variety of challenges not faced by their peers without disabilities in order to gain entry to and succeed in postsecondary education. These challenges are often especially difficult for persons with disabilities of culturally and linguistically diverse heritage. Session presenters described a framework for cultural competence and linguistic competence, discussed the framework’s essential role in transition, and provided recommendations for supporting educational success for persons with disabilities of culturally and linguistically diverse heritage.

Presenters:

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Self-Determination: The Intersection of Youth Development and Transition

Moderator: James Alarid, New Mexico Highlands University

Description: This session described implementation of self-determination at Robertson High School in Las Vegas, New Mexico. Panel members shared practical strategies to support students’ development of self-determination skills, strategies for including parents/families in the self-determination process, information on how self-determination is reconciled with standards-based reform, and information on how self-determination changes the lives of youth with disabilities.

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Standards and Assessments: Implications of No Child Left Behind

Moderator: Patti Ralabate, National Education Association

Description: The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) requires schools and school districts to demonstrate that all students are making “adequate yearly progress,” as benchmarked by average test scores and other measures. NCLB specifically requires that students with disabilities, English language learners, minority students, and low-income students be fully included within state and local district testing and accountability practices. Further, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) put into place significant new requirements to ensure students greater access to the general education curriculum and assessment systems. Discussion in this session focused on policy developments which require schools nationwide to establish comprehensive systems responsive to the diverse needs of all students.

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